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Sports Treatments

Sports injuries to the hand, wrist, and elbow can occur during exercise or while participating in a sports activity. The R.I.C.E (rest, ice, compression, elevation) method is helpful for healing most sports injuries. This may reduce swelling and help reduce additional pain and bruising in the initial stages. However, because different sports can produce different symptoms and complications, it is important to see an experienced hand surgeon, like Dr. Mark Pruzansky and Dr. Jason Pruzansky in order to assess the potential damage done and optimize a treatment and recovery plan.

Located in Manhattan, HandSport Surgery Institute is one of the country’s leading institutes for minimally invasive hand, wrist, and elbow surgery. This approach allows patients to recover faster, generally with minimal downtime, while maintaining an emphasis on maximizing performance.

Sports Injury Treatments at HandSport Surgery Institute

The treatment your sports injury requires will depend on the type and severity of the injury in question. You should always see a sports medicine surgeon at the first sign of injury to receive the best possible diagnosis. It is important to cease all sports activity to try and prevent further injury to the affected region, especially since attempting to play before it has healed can lead to further damage and delayed recovery.

Non-surgical

Dr. Mark Pruzansky and Dr. Jason Pruzansky’s goal with any new patient is to avoid surgery whenever and if at all possible. Your injury will be assessed to evaluate the extent of the damage done by the injury and whether or not it can be treated with conservative methods. In such cases, your surgeon may elect to treat it with NSAIDs, a corticosteroid injection, immobilization by splinting, casting, rest, or buddy-taping.

Mallet Finger

With early diagnosis, the tip of the finger will be splinted into a fully straight or hyperextended position. This is designed to immobilize the tip of the finger while allowing the rest to bend freely. For injuries of this nature solely affecting the extensor tendon, the splint will usually be worn for a period of 8 weeks. For injuries involving a fracture, the splint wil be worn for 4-6 weeks. Surgery is typically unnecessary.

Boxer’s Fracture

Fractures with or without angulation can often be treated with simple immobilization using a cast or a brace. The metacarpal of the little finger can tolerate more angulation than the other metacarpals, so surgery is reserved for greater deformities

Boxer’s Knuckle

Most injuries of this nature will be treated with splinting and anti-inflammatory medication while the hand is rested. For more severe injuries, surgical repair may be required to treat snapping of the extensor tendon or joint instability.

Tennis Elbow

Most patients will heal with conservative management. In many cases, oral NSAIDs—such as diclofenac—and a corticosteroid injection will provide relief. Platelet-rich plasma may also aid healing. Your hand surgeon may suggest counterforce braces to reduce tension on the wrist extensor tendons.

Pitchers Elbow

Many patients benefit from a period of rest with anti-inflammatory medication. Most conservative treatment plans involve ice and nonsteroidal drugs. Most cases may require physical therapy. Surgical intervention may also be required in some cases that do not respond to conservative methods. Physical therapy is beneficial in treating treating pain and improving strength and mobility in the elbow and kinetic chain.

Little Leaguer’s Elbow

Most patients with this condition will be treated with rest and immobilization. Many patients benefit from a cool down period where no pitching is allowed. This enables the body to heal on its own. Your surgeon may recommend a progressive rehabilitative plan designed to retrain the elbow, entire upper extremity, and core to the feet.

Surgical Treatment

Surgical intervention may be required in those cases that do not respond to conservative methods. Your injury and its progress will be carefully monitored by Dr. Mark Pruzanksy and Dr. Jason Pruzansky to monitor whether it is progressing as expected. Routine check-ups designed to evaluate the injury by way of X-ray, MRI, or ultrasound will aid in careful management of the affected region in those cases for which surgical intervention is under consideration.

Boxer’s Fracture

Injuries involving angulated fractures typically benefit from surgical realignment to improve hand mechanics, strength, and range of motion of the finger. In cases where surgical intervention is required, this fracture can be treated with closed reduction and bony fixation.

Boxer’s Knuckle

In injuries that are painful with an intact extensor tendon moving the joint, anti-inflammatory medication may treat the hand at rest. However, in more severe cases that involve pain or the inability to straighten the finger, or involve snapping of the extensor tendon with the presence of joint instability, surgical intervention is required to improve function.

Jersey Finger

This condition benefits from immediate treatment designed to achieve the best outcome. The torn flexor tendon requires immediate reattachment of the bone in the fingertip. In optimal cases, this will improve function in the finger. Following surgery, splinting and occupational therapy are required to strengthen the joint and return flexibility.

Pitcher’s Finger

This condition benefits from a prompt diagnosis. While many cases can be treated with immobilization and ring splints with occupational therapy, severe cases may require surgical intervention. In such cases, any flexor tendon dysfunction may benefit from repair or reconstruction of the torn pulleys to improve finger function.

Tennis Elbow

For severe cases of Tennis Elbow, open and arthroscopic surgery via small incisions generally produces good results. This is an outpatient procedure. Specialized instruments are placed through the incisions and used to remove scar tissue and damaged tissue. Alternative, the torn tendon(s) will be reattached to the bone. The decision for surgery follows a moderate trial of conservative care.

Pitcher’s Elbow

This condition sometimes requires UCL reconstruction, which is commonly referred to as the Tommy John Surgery. If surgical repair is required, physical therapy is required to regain mobility and range of motion. Rehabilitation may take up to two years for some athletes. While most patients have improvement, not all return to their prior level of competition.

If You Believe You Have a Sports Injury, Contact HandSport Surgery Institute

Please contact us as soon as possible to schedule an appointment with our talented team. People experiencing basketball injuries should be evaluated to optimize performance and try to reduce the possibility of further injury and mobility issues.

If you have been injured, it’s important to be evaluated by a highly skilled professional. Call Dr. Mark Pruzansky and Dr. Jason Pruzansky at 212-249-8700 to schedule an appointment, obtain an accurate diagnosis, and begin recovery after your hand, wrist, or elbow injury.

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